Faculty & Staff FAQs: COVID 19 + Career

Table of Contents

Should students plan to go to spring internship sites in person?
Do students HAVE to go to their internship sites?
What if a student wants to go to an internship site, but the employer won’t let them or isn’t able to let them?
Should we continue to offer our internship/independent learning courses this spring?
I’m working with an employer and they are unsure about remote work. What resources can I provide?
Who can I contact with questions?

Should students plan to go to spring internship sites in person?

Governor Inslee has announced a “Stay at Home” order for all Washingtonians until Sunday, May 31 for non-essential businesses. If a student is interning at a non-essential business they should not be working in person. Also, UW Seattle Schools and Colleges are recommending that students complete all experiential learning opportunities remotely for spring quarter. You can read the message from College of Arts & Sciences Dean, Bob Stacey, here and how it will impact experiential learning courses for spring 2020. We will update this page as new information is disseminated. Guidelines may differ for Bothell and Tacoma students.  If students can conduct their internship remotely, that is the most ideal solution at this time. By conducting internships from home, students reduce potential risk of exposure, practice good social distancing as recommended by the Center for Disease Control (CDC), and still complete work vital to organizations. Encourage students to talk with their site supervisors about the potential to work remotely for the duration of their spring quarter internships. You can refer employers to our new handout, Developing Remote Internships, if they have questions about how to set their students up for remote work. They can also use our Internship Work Plan Template to help develop goals and tracking progress. If students are unable to work remotely, encourage them to talk with their employers about a plan for their internship. Some questions for them to consider: Are employees still coming in to work? What measures are being taken to mitigate exposure to others? What will the nature of your work be given the circumstances? If the student and employer agree on a plan that works for them and take their health and safety into account, then they are welcome to complete the internship as discussed.

Do students HAVE to go to their internship sites?

No, they do not. Student health and safety should be our first priority. Encourage students to talk with their employer about alternative forms of work. If these are not possible, it may be that they must resign from the internship if in-person work is the only option available.

What if a student wants to go to an internship site, but the employer won’t let them or isn’t able to let them?

If remote work is not an option for an internship, and the employer does not want them to come in-person, or is unable to allow them to do so, unfortunately options are limited. Encourage the student to talk with their employer about whether they can start working once normal operations resume. During the delay, students can talk with a Career Coach about other opportunities for work and ways to advance their learning.

Should we continue to offer our internship/independent learning courses this spring?

Yes! Students conducting in-person or remote internships should still have the opportunity to participate in internship and independent learning courses as originally scheduled. For many students these courses help them meet graduation requirements and may be required for a major or work visa (international students).  Students that are unable to complete their internship in any form (in-person or remote), will likely be unable to take an internship course. We encourage departments with faculty-sponsored courses to consider alternate assignments and learning models for students unable to participate in a co-curricular experience.  The UW Center for Teaching and Learning has published guidelines on creating remote instructional content.  LinkedIn Learning has given free 1-month trials for all of its course content. Check out these courses on online teaching techniques: Learning to Teach Online, Teaching with Technology, Teaching Technical Skill through Video, Teaching Online: Synchronous Classes. Also, the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) published an article with ideas for academic projects in lieu or a traditional internship experiences.

I’m working with an employer and they are unsure about remote work. What resources can I provide?

You can refer employers to our new Developing Remote Internships handout for best practices on setting up students for remote work. In addition, here is some information from UW HR about planning for remote work.

Who can I contact with questions?

Contact Dan Herb, Internship Success Manager at dherb@uw.edu